About our herbs

“Gamtos galia” (eng. Power of Nature) offers tea mixes of herbs and aromatic or medicinal plants picked and collected in Lithuanian meadows and forests.

The extraordinary feature of our herb is that we do not chop them. We combine our mixes only from the herbs we collect with our own hands. It means that all the herbs are carefully picked, grown, dried and sorted . Once you open a box you can see the separated herbs. You are free to choose how many of each type you wish to add to your tea cup or pot. When you brew your tea you can see how blossoms and leaves open up and start spreading their aroma.

All tea mixes are built in order to have a pleasant aroma and great taste. On top of that we add certain herbs which do not necessarily have a pleasant fragrance but possess good preventive features and can help cure various physical complaints as well as calm down or energise if needed.

In case you feel ill the first thing you need to do is to consult a doctor – our teas are not considered to be drugs for curing one or another disease. None of the herbs should be treated as substitutes for medicine even though you know that some pills are made of similar herbs.

Tea brewing

Once you want to prepare your tea, select some herbs and place them in a cup and pour hot (not boiling) water on top. Do not boil the herbs in order not to lose their active ingredients. Cover a cup and leave it for 5-10 minutes. Then, you can either drink it or filter it first. Still, remember not to throw the herbs away because you can re-use them one more time. If you like your tea to be sweet, choose honey instead of sugar - it will add to the good taste. Remember it is better that your herbal tea is not too hot. Try drinking it slowly and feel how each sip is both delicious and effective.

We do not recommend drinking one type of herbal tea longer than 2 weeks and more often than 2 times a day. That is already considered herbal treatment, so you should consult your doctor first.

Fresh lemon balm leaves
Ready herbs for tea
A small art work

Herbs we use to create our teas

English name Latin name
Basil
grass
Ocimum basilicum
Beefsteak plant
grass
Perilla frutescenes
Black locust
blossoms
Robinia pseudoacacia
Blackcurrant
leaves
Ribes nigrum L.
Broad-leaved thyme
grass
Thymus pulegioides
Broadleaf plantain
grass
Plantago major
Catnip
grass
Nepeta cataria
Coltsfoot
leaves
Tussilago farfara
Common evening primrose
blossoms
Oenothera biennis
Common heather
grass
Calluna vulgaris
Common mallow
grass
Malva sylvestris
Common nettle
grass
Urtica dioica
Common oat
grass
grain
Avena sativa
Common rockrose
petals
Helianthemum nummularium
Crimson beebalm
grass
Monarda didyma
Elderberry
blossoms
Sambucus nigra
Elephant's ears (bergenia)
leaves
Bergenia crassifolia
European dewberry
leaves
Rubus caesius
European peony
petals
Paeonia officinalis
Field horsetail
grass
Equisetum arvense
Fireweed
grass
Chamerion angustifolium
Garden angelica Angelica archangelica
Garden nasturtium
blossoms
Tropaeolum majus
Great burnet Sanguisorba officinalis
English name Latin name
Ground elder
leaves
Aegopodium podagraria
Heartsease
grass
Viola tricolor
Hyssop
grass
Hyssopus officinalis
Lemon balm
grass
Melissa officinalis
Little-leaf Linden
blossoms
Tilia cordata
Meadowsweet
blossoms
Filipendula ulmaria
Moldavian dragonhead
grass
Dracocephalum moldavica
Peppermint
grass
Mentha x piperita
Pot marigold
blossoms
Calendula officinalis
Raspberry
leaves
Rubus ideaus
Red clover
blossoms
Trifolium pratense
Roman camomile
blossoms
Matricaria recutita
Scots pine
blossoms
Pinus silvestris
Silver birch
leaves
Betula pendula
St John's wort
grass
Hypericum Perforatum
Sweet clover
blossoms
Melilotus albus
Sweet grass
leaves
Hierochloe odorata
Sweet mock-orange
blossoms
Philadelphus coronarius
Valerian
roots
Valeriana officinalis
White Deadnettle
blossoms
leaves
Lamium album
Wild cherry
leaves
Cerasus vulgaris
Wild strawberry
leaves
Fragaria vesca
Yellow sweet clover
blossoms
Melilotus officinalis
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